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Recycling: Good for the Environment - And Your Content

  Recycle. Like I just did with this free stock photo from Pixabay.com.

Recycle. Like I just did with this free stock photo from Pixabay.com.

By David Berry: What is a business to do when they're listening to every marketing expert around tell them that 'content is king,' but they don't have the resources worthy of a kingship? Recycle.

No, I'm not talking about your cans and bottles (but that's a good idea, too). I'm talking about recycling old content.

Think that feels 'cheap'? It's not. And it's actually more common than you think. According to Digiday: 

The Atlantic, which uses archival material on both the print and digital sides of its business, now generates more than a quarter of its traffic every month from older content. At publications like Business Insider, the figure is even higher, and for lifestyle-focused publications like Refinery29 it’s higher still: 35 percent, and growing, the company said.
— Digiday.com

The rationale makes sense too. For three reasons.

  1. It uses fewer resources. You already created the content; you're just driving people back to it. Less is more.
  2. Message frequency = message penetration. This is how old TV advertising budgets were built; they knew they needed to deliver the message multiple times for it to really get noticed. When that happens, you get top of mind brand awareness, and that pays dividends when it comes to generating repeat traffic - particularly for ecom brands.
  3. It's easier to plan. As Neha Gandhi, Refinery29’s svp of content strategy and innovation, said, “Betting exclusively on the news cycle is far too volatile a game to play, if you’re looking to drive sustained growth and loyalty.” Find evergreen themes, and build on those.

Here are a few tips to get you started on an evergreen content strategy:

  1. Develop content categories. Let's say you run a grocery store chain. Regardless of time of year, target users of a grocery store will always have an interest in food/ingredients, the in-store experience, recipes and finished products/dishes, how the foods bring value to an every day lifestyle, and so on. When creating evergreen content, make sure you have these pillars established. It'll ensure that your content is always relevant, and always on brand.
  2. Use it everywhere. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and any other pertinent social media channels. Plug it in your email content, your corporate blog, and at retail store level, as appropriate.
  3. Then, use it again. If you're worried about users thinking you're selling it off as 'new' content two or three months after you first used it, be up front about it. Say 'In case you missed it!' (ICYMI), or 'From the archives.' This keeps you transparent, and allows you to gain extra traffic and engagement on content that otherwise would sit in solitude.

Have any tips of your own? Leave them in the comments. And don't forget to subscribe to our emails for more tips that we'll send directly to your inbox.

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