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Why Good Marketers Are Good Lovers

By David Berry: Valentine's Day is less than a month away, so I've got romance on my mind. My girlfriend will be happy to read that. But all the thoughts of chocolate and delicious meals (let's be honest, that's every day) reminded me of my favorite analogy.

And that is to compare good marketing to being a good lover. Before I explain, let's all share in the romance of a good Keith Sweat music video.

Okay, now that we've got that out of our system, let's get to it. Far too many brands miss the love lesson altogether. They think, "well, I have this great thing/service to sell, and if I just tell people about it, they'll want to buy it."

Invariably, it doesn't work. It turns into a few weeks of consistent social media efforts and very little ROI, then complete abandonment. Or a handful of emails or blog posts, minimal response, then the complaint that "ugh, this stuff just doesn't work."

Anytime I engage a business owner in this conversation, I ask them, "Well, if you gave up so quickly in your love life, would you have ever gotten married?"

The response is always the same - a smile and a chuckle. But that's exactly where we should be looking for our lessons as marketers. Any successful relationship involves a consistent, measured approach. You have to vary your pursuit; dinner one night, dancing another, or an event centered around a shared interest. And here's the kicker - you have to show consistent interest in the one you're pursuing! If you want to keep them, you always need to be attentive to their changing needs and wants. If you decide that they're not worthy of your pursuit - and only once you're sure that's the case - then you can move on.

You can't ask a girl on one date, abandon her for a few months, then show up out of nowhere and ask her to marry you. Or keep taking her on the same date over and over again and expect her not to wonder if there's something better out there. This may sound like total lunacy, yet that's exactly what brands do all the time!

They post a few pieces of content one day (a first date), then immediately start asking for clients to buy their products (marriage proposal) without much regard for how the content was received - if at all. Then they wonder why consumers are slow to buy from them.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but your brand/product/service isn't special enough to circumvent the rules of marketing. There are no overnight successes. Those who are consistent, attentive and dedicated to their customers will win them - and keep them.

Any good lover knows that.

-DB